Skribe’s Postcards: A Special Delivery

Skribe fans know his minimalist approach.  He makes huge music and art with so few raw materials.  He kicks at a ratty old hi-hat cymbal and bass drum fashioned out of a battered suitcase while he yanks tunes out of yard sale guitars or a canjozookie, an 8-stringed creature made from an old oil can.  He plays a kazoo. skribe canjo-zookie It might look like an accident but it sounds like the sorcerer’s apprentice has enchanted a music store.  His sound and his vibe enchanted enough people to crowdfund his entire 2014 album, Less is More.  How one guy makes that much music is magic indeed!

In December of 2016, Skribe released Postcards, a collection of eight songs with him backed by a full band.  It’s exactly the album many of his fans already heard in their heads.  Anyone who has caught him live has seen plenty of high-test musicians lined up to jam with him and been treated to some obscenely good collaborations.  On Postcards, Skribe takes a road trip with all his musical buddies riding shotgun.  And from the first notes, you’re along for the ride.  This is a fun album!  And if you’re not careful, you might learn something too.

“Wide Awake,” the first track, is about insomnia.  You, fellow traveler, follow his imagination “…through the ceiling into outer space” and back again to the central questions of life.  How does he answer them?  He seeks “…the unturned stones still on the old frontier.”  The music buzzes and reverberates and sounds like infinity.  Six instruments include electric guitar, vibraphone and electric carillon.  After a few listens, you may actually dream about scenes from this song.  It won’t disturb your sleep but it might make you hum in the daylight.  It’s the new sound of ancient wisdom and wondering.

The deep thoughts continue on track two.  Yet “Common Ground” reminds us how simple life can be in the moment.  Horns and drums give the tune an international, festival kind of vibe.  He says, “…the settled heads of perfect pours rise with high demand so fill your soul or thirst for more but tonight won’t come again.”

“Home Sweet Home” would make a great rap.  Or it could have been a hit for Hank Williams.  Skribe grins that he’s gonna “…grow on you like a wicked weed.”   It’s a rambler’s tale of chasing a muse.

“Mayonnaise & Honey” is a rock song about passion.  You’ll get it.  It rocks.

The savory instrumental “Canned Ham Blues” is actually played on a hamjo.  Yep.  It’s a stringed instrument made from the can from a canned ham.  It’s all Skribe.

The song “M.I.Y” had its actual debut in a video Skribe submitted to the 2016 NPR Tiny Desk Concert series.  You can make it yourself.  It’s all about perspective.  In the video you actually see a tiny desk and the canjozookie.

The last original song on the record is “Partners in Crime.”  It could be a paean to his muse, his guitar, his band or his audience.  Whatever the meaning, he means it.  It’s obvious that Skribe, aka Aaron Yealdhall, is at home wherever he finds himself.  He’s enjoying looking for himself and for us.  At shows since the record’s release, he’s introduced himself saying “My name’s Aaron and I play in this band called Skribe.”

So fans can now have something in their hands that they’ve heard in their heads and hearts for a while.  Yes Aaron is Skribe but Skribe is also an idea, an entity.  It’s very Zen for garage folk.  It’s also rock, country and the blues with this big-ol’ band and high production values.  It’s the jackalope in the landscape, the wings on the vacuum tube, and the helmet on the dog.   On these Postcards, Skribe delivers some wonders of the world you will want to write home about and visit over and over.

The final song on the album is “Strangers” by Dave Davies of The Kinks, from their 1970 album Lola.  It says “Strangers on this road we are on, we are not two we are one.”  It’s a perfect fit with the journey metaphors of this album and brings us all home together.

Hello 2017: Charmed I’m Sure

Hello 2017.  I feel like you will be a momentous year for this Earth.  I vow to share all the love I have and music I can gather.  2016 took too many of my musical heroes.  But the music is still here and so are all the people it inspired.  I dedicate my work in 2017 to heroes passed, to being present and to building a future filled with inspiration.

I created a playlist of some of my most memorable shows in 2016.  I kept it to twelve songs by twelve bands but obviously I saw many more great shows and bands.  All of these bands worked their asses off to make the world a happier place and I thank them for it!  I reveled in new releases by Ton-Taun, a new musical pairing with Bjorn Jacobsen and Francois Byers and several new acts that really trip my trigger.  Yam Yam is a funk-rock band from Harrisburg that you can’t help but dig.  Bethlehem and Sad Patrick are so honest and human; they reach me on a biological level.  ovvls bbcOVVLS is an experimental psychedelic duo from Liverpool UK who blessed me with the opportunity to be their tour manager for 12 days.  I can’t look at that playlist and not feel optimistic about the future of music and the spirit of humanity!

Speaking of music, spirit and optimism: I’m hosting Music Friday concerts at 551 West in Lancaster every month in 2017!  shawanTo start the year right, Shawan and The Wonton will bring smooth soul, a touch of folk and a trunk of funk to town.  I feel like life is sending a healing angel on a day many may feel anxious or upset.  Come have some great food and drinks with us.  The show is free and it may free you too.  Shawan should give you a bump for a week!

By Friday January 27th, I predict you’ll be ready for some heavyweight blues.  We have a three-round pounder for you at Tellus360!  I named it Three Points of the Compass Blues because these three acts bring a world of blues styles and hail from three different cities.  ben-voOur center point and headlining is Benjamin Vo Blues Band from little ol’ Lititz.  His skills are ridiculous and he pours his heart into every note of vocals and guitar.  Nobody’s music made a bigger impact on me in 2016 than Ben’s.  Boom.

Hailing from the northern port of Williamsport is Gabe Stillman and The Billtown Giants.  I know these cats from Bullfrog Brewery.  Gabe is young on the outside and ancient on the inside.  He’s actually taking his band south: to The International Blues Challenge in Memphis, TN.  He’s actually the reason I created this show with Tellus360.  I hosted Gabe at 551 West in November.  Here’s one where Ben sat in!

Our southerner, from The Land of Pleasant Living, is Skribe.  You all know I love Annapolis and its bottomless well of talent.  Skribe is the guy standing there, grinning, cranking the handle and filling your cup.  It won’t take but a few sips of what he’s pouring before you’re loopy for his style. Skribe2 If you caught him when I used to bring him to Dispensing Company, on the main stage at FloydFest, or at any of his 200+ shows a year, I know I’ll see you at Tellus360 on the 27th.  This is a $10 show for just $5 folks!

Nothing like a bargain to start the year right!  Catch some feels with Shawan and The Wonton for free on Friday 20th.  Catch hold of the blues and shake that bugger with Three Points of the Compass Blues on Friday 27th for just $5.  I guarantee that will keep you boppin’ and rockin’ till Groundhog Day at least!

Medusa’s Disco Goes Acoustic: Fruit From a Timeless Planet

Medusa’s Disco Goes Acoustic: No No No Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah!

Maybe you’re old enough or maybe you saw it on YouTube.  Once upon a time MTV played music videos and even hosted a performance series called “Unplugged.”  When grunge rockers Nirvana made their “Unplugged” appearance, lots of people were skeptical…for about half a song.  Somehow the raw, painful beauty of their songs still bored into your heart even though they weren’t blasting your ears.

Such is the trick pulled here by Medusa’s Disco on Fruit From a Timeless Planet, their 2016 acoustic release.  The songs still feel like voices in your head.  They muse on disregard and despair.  The boys still ask big questions about the state of the world, time and space.  The screams and roars have become wails and whispers, calling you to consciousness like some lost band of monks chanting and tripping on Ibogaine.  They pick a line, repeat it, harmonize it and build it up until you’re breathing it as much as hearing it.  “Around here…it’s all so simple…it’s not so simple…no, no, no yeah-yeah-yeah-yeah-yeah-yeah!” from “Ask the Bird” will have you winking and flying off in one verse.

The intricate rhythms and melodies lend this acoustic set a progressive sensibility.  They don’t have the organs and synthesizers of 70’s era ELP or Yes but they do have ecstatic sitar and violin.  Does anything sound more psychedelic and other-worldly than a sitar?  medusa-acousticFor a young player, Wynton Huddle has a sensual hug on that thing.  And Robin Chambers on violin has long been recognized as a portal to another world.  She’s a special addition to the acoustic edition of MD.  Bees, butterflies and buzzards live in her bow.  Alex Aument on percussion shows a deft touch that belies his years of Muppet-Animal-like explosive nature on drums.  Ty Smith seems freed by going acoustic and styling more on his bass.

The human voice, of course, is the ultimate acoustic instrument.  Hunter Root and Wynton wield their voices like Jedi’s.  You hear and feel every swing of their vocal pipes.  Wails and whispers, screams and roars, mind tricks: they capture your senses and your imagination.  They are vocal pyres that throw a lot of heat.

There’s a complexity and depth to the music beyond the expectations of “…X rock band makes an acoustic album.”  And even with all the bemoaning of lies, liars and promises not kept, they still see promise in the world and reasons to pursue curiosity and enlightenment.  “Don’t wait ‘til you die…to become Divine.”  That is some nourishing Fruit From a Timeless Planet.

Term Limits: A Real Political Revolution

I love politics.  Not the politics as seen on TV, which is just the propaganda and the hype.  I love the idea that we can elect people to represent us and work to make our society better for all.  I have seen government protect people from pollution, monopolies and disease.  I have seen it fund infrastructure and public safety projects.  I understand why a majority of people today are upset with government corruption, unbalanced budgets and laws that are not fair to everyone.  In a weird way, it even makes sense that Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders got the most press during the primary season.  They both attacked the way Washington does business and Americans want real change.  I know I do.

Trump mostly talked about himself and who he hates.  Bernie talked about leading a revolution.  I prefer revolution to hate.  But this isn’t about who I prefer for president (none of the above).  It’s about taking government out of the pocket of big money interests and holding politicians accountable for their promises.  By enacting term limits on all political offices, we can end the era of career politicians.

The founding fathers never foresaw that people would serve in Congress and then spend the rest of their lives seeking reelection.  America was founded by people who were suspicious and mistrustful of a wealthy ruling class.  It was our revolution: “…of the people, by the people, for the people.”  Ratifying the Constitution took twelve years because the representatives fought for controls that would protect their individual states from an over-reaching federal government.  They also fought to ensure the separation of church and state and the even distribution of powers among the President, the Supreme Court and Congress.  Then they went home and got back to their own business.  They were respected in their communities because they had sacrificed their own interests and put the welfare of the country first.

A President can only serve two terms of four years.  When George Washington retired after two terms, he set that standard.  Yes FDR was elected to a fourth term in 1944 but that was largely because the Allies had begun to turn the tide in the war against Nazi Germany.  FDR was wildly popular among average citizens recovering from the Great Depression and eager to win a war against dictators in Germany, Italy and Japan.  Big business hated FDR’s New Deal programs and decried the creation of a “welfare state.”  No President since then has sought a third term.

Presidents nominate candidates for the Supreme Court and Congress holds hearings to approve them.  Justices hold office for life so their honesty, impartiality and intelligence must be beyond reproach.  Many argue that nominating Supreme Court justices may be a President’s greatest power but no nominee goes to the bench without approval by Congress.  Informed and engaged citizens would voice their opinions to their congressmen and senators and help ensure confirmation of justices who would protect their rights.  But Congress seems to represent their political parties more so than they represent their constituents.  And too many of our citizens are woefully uninformed and not engaged.

Big business and their lobbyists are to blame.  The money they pour into reelection campaigns and sponsorship of bills has created a wealthy ruling class: Congress.  The time for a new revolution has arrived.  Big money isn’t going to go away.  But if we make the career politicians go away, perhaps Congress can once again be the voice of citizens beyond investors and shareholders.

Trump and Sanders both got it right.  People are ready for change.  Matt Taibi of Rolling Stone summed it brilliantly in his article “Appetite for Destruction” (RS1267, 8/11/16).

“Trump was always just smart enough to see that the same money backs the Jeb Bushes and Hillary Clintons of the world.  But he never had the vision or the empathy to understand, beyond the level of a punchline, the frustrations linking disenfranchised voters on both the left and right.

Presented with a rare opportunity to explain how the two parties stoke divisions on social issues to keep working people from realizing their shared economic dilemmas, Trump backed down.  Even if he didn’t believe it, he could have turned such truths into effective campaign rhetoric.  But such great themes are beyond hid pampered, D-minus mind.  Instead, he tried to poach Sanders voters simply by chanting Bernie’s name like a magic word.”

Money and those who sling it that have the ears of Congress and the President.  They don’t care if we’re angry as long as we keep lining up at the same feeding troughs.

Trump will go back to reality TV soon and Bernie will return to the Senate; that’s exactly what America needs right now.  Senator Sanders can lead the revolution by introducing term-limits legislation.  Citizens can lobby their representatives to vote for it or promise to vote them out of office.  In eight to twelve years, America could have representatives who go to Washington to fight for the issues that concern them, not to cuddle up to big money and spend their days opposing the other political party and seeking reelection.

Members of Congress are supposed to represent their constituents and the issues that concern them.  Security, health care, education, immigration, infrastructure and the economy: these are the concerns of the people.  In our capitalist nation, they are also big businesses.  Do we need better bombs or better schools?  Should medicines only be available to those who can afford them?  Will the internet mean we don’t needs roads or cities anymore?  Is the tax code fair?  Can these issues be debated fairly by a Congress who listens to business more than the voters at home?  Everyone says no.

Our representatives should be the experts in these fields who are willing to suspend their careers for six to eight years and go to Washington.  Their goals shouldn’t be becoming politicians.  Their goals should be issue specific to their states and good for America as a whole.  A safe, healthy, prosperous America is good for the world.

The President is our chief diplomat and public symbol of our values and resolve.  They come and go with election cycles.  The Supreme Court justices write and uphold our laws.  But as long as there are lawyers, those justices will have to justify every decision and prepare to be challenged.  It’s Congress that needs accountability.  No more career politicians: it’s been my rallying cry for quite a while.

If you’re still reading, have a few laughs as a reward.  George Carlin knew us best.

Au Revior LRB

I haven’t blogged much lately because I’ve been blue.  I’m sharing today that I am no longer contracted to Lancaster Roots and Blues, A Festival of Music, as the director of operations.  Mr. Rich Ruoff fired me on June 20.  I questioned his judgement one time too many I guess.  If you want another version of the story, you will have to ask him about it.  If you would like to comment, please do so here!  If you have comments or questions about LRB, please direct them to Mr. Ruoff.

I’m very proud of the work and investment I made in the festival over its first three years.  I hope you all enjoyed yourselves and I hope it thrives for many years to come.  Thank you Lancaster for being a great city for the event.  Thank you to the venues and the artists for your outstanding connection to the attendees.  Thank you to the restaurants who helped me feed the artists and volunteers.  Thank you volunteers and staff!

Gigspots will continue to book bands, produce events and tours, and bring you the latest in music news, videos, show and music reviews.  Watch for a revised version of the website to debut in August and catch us at shows and festivals around the mid-Atlantic!

Thanks and Shouts for LRB 2016

I gave myself three weeks before writing about Lancaster Roots and Blues.  Just as I work behind the curtain for the festival, I heal and reflect in private.  Someday I’ll tell my stories.  For now I’m enjoying hearing your experiences and seeing your pictures and videos.  In particular, I’d like to thank Dan Gillespie of DGital for sharing hundreds of brilliant action shots that really bring the festival to life again.  You have a peerless eye and a generous heart brother!

I need to thank my stage managers for keeping the artists happy and organized.  You did a remarkable job this year under some challenging circumstances.  I need to thank my lead volunteers and their staffs.  You helped our attendees feel welcome, find their way and enjoy their experience.  You are great hosts and help create the vibe that keeps people smiling all over town.

I saw less music this year than either of the previous years.  It made me really sad.  But I brought more bands to the festival than before and by all accounts they played their asses off!  Thank you: Kaleigh Baker, Sweet Leda, Deb Guy, Sam Baker, Stolen Rhodes, Tractor Jerry and The Mudbucket, Gabe Stillman and the Billtown Giants, Frog Holler, Swampcandy, The O’My’s, Sympathy & the Lion and Shawan and The Wonton.  You are stars to me and I appreciate how hard you worked to make our fans get off!

One of my priorities during the festival is getting all the bands and volunteers fed.  I couldn’t do that without the support of Lancaster’s great restaurant community and their staffs.  Particular thanks must be extended to Carr’s, Commonwealth on Queen, Bistro Barberet & Bakery and Characters Pub who created and served the remarkable food for our VIP receptions.  You made people feel special even as their numbers swelled beyond projections.  The following restaurants helped me feed 300 musicians and 230 volunteers while serving capacity crowds of their own: Fat Pigs, The Pressroom, La Piazza, 551 West, Penn Square Grille, Dispensing Company, Annie Bailey’s, Federal Taphouse, Tellus 360 and Isaac’s Pickle Bar and Deli.  Lancaster is blessed to have you all!

She won’t like it, but I must single out Carrie Binkley our Production Manager.  If Rich is the brain and I’m the hands and feet of this festival, she is nothing less than the skeleton.  She provides the framework and connectivity that enable us to move with purpose and stability.

I hope everyone enjoyed the festival and will continue to support its growth!  I’m not sure how many small cities could host, sustain and grow a festival this big this quickly but Lancaster, you make it look easy.  You are a city authentic with charm, character and vivacity few towns your size could even imagine.  Obviously we are blessed with a lot of great music venues, restaurants and shops but they are just buildings without the remarkable people who run them.  Thank you people of Lancaster!

Reboot Camp

I ended 2015 wanting a fresh start.  On a simple level that meant tasks like cleaning out the closets, reorganizing my office and sorting a few piles of “pitch, keep, or pay it forward.”  On a higher level, it meant choosing healthy over haggard.  Somewhere in between, I needed to repurpose my business to reflect five years of experience.  So I’ve thrown away a bunch of stuff, quit smoking cigarettes and begun the redesign of Gigspots.  January 2016 has been the hardest month of my life since boot camp in 1981.

You learn a lot about yourself in challenging times.  I was sure I would die those first few weeks of basic training at Fort Bliss, Texas, the most misnamed post in any man’s Army.  Fifteen weeks later I knew I could “fuck, fight and hold the light” on any continent.  Thirty five years later I laugh at the memories and love to tell the stories.  Our drill instructors loved to remind us that “You assholes volunteered for this!”  They all had been drafted and served combat duty in Vietnam.

A former student recently reminded me that I’d recommended a book to her, The Four Agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz.  She said it changed her life; I knew it had mine.  The four agreements you make with yourself are:  1) Be impeccable with your word, 2) Don’t take anything personally, 3) Don’t make assumptions and 4) Always do your best.  After this reminder (thanks S.F.), I recalled that the book had popped up in some close friends’ lives recently.  I decided I had to re-read it.  I don’t believe in random.

The week before, I had uncovered Ruiz’s book cleaning out my office and I also found my copy of the book Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath.  This personality assessment book meant much to me when I had decided to leave teaching and try to rediscover what mattered to me.  The idea behind the book is that our society wastes much time and energy trying to “fix” our weaknesses rather than recognizing and employing our strengths.   My top five themes are Empathy, Input, Intellection, Activator and Connectedness.

So the boxes of photos and books from my past remind me of tough times endured and joyous times realized.  They give me something to do instead of smoking which it now seems I spent most of my waking hours doing.  I’ve been taking time to rediscover elements of my character and reassessing how should reflect them.  After all, I am the brand.  My life themes are the business themes.

So I empathize with your need to find entertainment among people you enjoy.  I do the homework to give you input on what’s out there.  I ask the big questions like, “Will this enrich some lives?” and I support the causes, not just the events.  Think global, act local.  Connectedness means “…fortifying the bonds between yourself, the people you know, or even those you will never meet.”  That’s what Gigspots is about.  I’m building campfires we can all gather around and celebrate what makes us human.

Here We Go Again

I was born and raised in Pittsburgh where “Here we go” is followed by “Steelers.”  The MNF game last night between the Steelers and San Diego Chargers was a lucky win for my team.  A friend of mine is fond of saying, “I’d rather be lucky than good.”  I think if you work hard enough towards a goal, luck just might find you.  I hope I’m right.

bjorn1I can tell you that Bjorn Jacobsen is working hard on his PA tour.  The NEPA leg included two Wilkes-Barre gigs and shows in Bloomsburg, Williamsport, State College, West Chester, Lancaster and East York: eight shows in ten days.  I was lucky to be his host, wheel man, sound man and big fan on five of those nights and I’m looking forward to a few more before Boy Wander heads back to NOLA.  His singing is stronger than ever and he still thrashes that acoustic guitar.  There was a brief sighting of Amanda and baby Adelei at DipCo and jeepers that baby is cute!  Bjorn is opening my big show this Friday 10/16 at Elks Lodge.  Come see how strong and lucky The Wayfarer has become!

Jamall AnthonyIf you want to see work that’s play, join us for Music Fridays in Lancaster at The BPOE Elks Lodge Ballroom this Friday. Bjorn opens with some jangly, rootsy tales of love and woe.  Soul singer Jamall Anthony from Coatesville is in the middle.  Maybe you saw one of his LAUNCH Music Conference shows or have heard him on 93.7 WSTW?  This guy can really sing and this could be an, “I saw him when…” moment for all of us!  Here’s a bit of what made me say YEAH two years ago at LAUNCH.

Shrimpboat is the 8-piece super-group that means PARTY in Lancaster.  They’ve played all the biggest events in town since forming: NYE, Celebrate Lancaster, FlyFest, The Long’s Park Summer Concert Series etc.  Their stated mission is to get hips shaking.  They do it and make it look easy.  Come get some easy!

As the stage doors at DipCo swing shut (one showcase left), a window is swinging open at Federal Taphouse.  I’ve been asked to book a series of performances there between now and Christmas.  First up will be Skribe on Friday October 23rd!  As I left the meeting confirming this experiment at Taphouse, thinking, “Ok, who do I get to play in two weeks?”  I received a call from Skribe.Skribe2  A venue had just cancelled a 10/23 gig on him and could I find something along his tour route?  I don’t know what to call that but luck.  If you’ve seen Skribe, you know how lucky we all are!  If you haven’t, your lucky day is 10/23 when you get to see him for free, eat artisan, wood-fired pizza and drink craft beer.

So I got lucky trying to do good for a local business and a touring musician friend.  It’s been a mantra at Gigspots and the folks I work with are doing well.  It’s also what motivates me to work harder.  I’m about to add ten new venues to  It will be a lot more work but I believe I’m serving the community.  I believe if you do good, luck finds you.  Doing good and doing well are not synonymous though.  Doing good is about rewards for others.  Doing well is about rewards for you.  The luckiest people find ways to accomplish both.

Stagelights Dim at DipCo

I got some sad news over the weekend.  The Lancaster Dispensing Company has decided to cease staging live music after Thanksgiving 2015.  They have been a live music venue since opening in 1978.  To me, it was the equivalent of having your favorite uncle die.DipCo new

I grew up in the restaurant business.  I know it’s a really tough way to make a living.  You count your inventory by the ounce and your profits by the pennies.  You work every weekend and most holidays.  There are hundreds of laws to comply with and you can’t choose your neighbors.  You are the top of the food chain so everyone else’s costs get passed on to you.

So why did the music have to die?  I can only conjecture on Bradley and Judy’s reasons for making what I’m sure was a very tough decision.  I’m not keen to guess and frankly it’s none of my business.  I was thrilled to have the opportunity to stage eighteen Gigspots Showcases there.  I have two shows left: October 10 and November 14.  I’d be well pleased to see a good crowd!

OneKoast MD's Finest IX mapDipCo has long been the hub of Lancaster’s music scene and it served me as a place to introduce many bands here.  It was a pivotal stop as I would take bands on tour around the region.  Besides getting their first exposure in our crucial Lancaster market, those bands knew they would get guaranteed pay at the end of the night.

There are few guarantees in life and fewer still for musicians and restaurateurs.  Most of those folks count on people coming in the door to cover their expenses and put some bread on their own tables.  Any musician will tell you that nights with a guarantee are what keep the boat afloat.  Any restaurateur will tell you that the only guarantees are that the bills will arrive and that regular customers can make or break you.

I’m not looking to lay blame any more than I’m guessing what motivated DipCo to stop the music.  There are a few facts that I can share.  The cover charge at the door is five dollars on music nights.  It’s been that price for decades.  Every night, I would see 12-20 people turn away at the door rather than pay it.  We all know that there is no place cheaper to eat and drink downtown and the food is great.  What’s the logic in paying $8 for a beer somewhere else when $8 at DipCo gets you a beer and live music all night?  On the other side of that coin: DipCo’s cover charge is $5 but their average sale per customer is nearly $12.  If you drop the cover charge, can you count on that clientele to meet your averages?  Or will six people share the large nachos and a pitcher of water while enjoying the music?  Either way it’s a risk.  And what value do you place on the artists’ work?

The only guaranteed losers in this equation are the musicians.  There is now one less place to play where you will be guaranteed a payout at the end of the night.  There is one less chance for you to reach the Lancaster market and build your following.  I know that’s crucial because so many nights are dependent on people coming through the door.  And yeah, I know that cover charges and hence band pay have been stagnant for thirty years.  It was $5 to see two bands in 1985 and it still is at nearly every venue.

Live, original music is only a small part of what The Lancaster Dispensing Company has given to our city since 1978.  I’ve had hundreds of great meals and memorable nights there.  It’s where I first met many of my favorite people in Lancaster, where I always brought out-of-town visitors and where I always could count on seeing friendly, familiar faces.  That’s not going to change.

bjorn1The Gigspots Spotlight Showcase on October 10 features two of my friends who are musical freaks.  Returning to the area from NOLA will be Bjorn Jacobsen, the Wayfarer himself, bringing savage tales of busking for a living and being a new daddy.  And yeah, all that dark stuff from the past and weird prophesies for the future will boil over too. Clinton Hibshman Opening the night and a whole can of whup-ass on guitars, harp and songs will be Clinton Hibshman.  I don’t waste a lot of words trying to describe him.  I just turn it up and grab a beer.  He embodies everything that happens at my favorite kinds of parties.

Help me make my last two shows at DipCo those kinds of parties.  Let the food, drinks and good times roll!  Have you partied there?  Have you played there?  Let’s celebrate what it’s meant to us all.

Up Around The Bend and Back

Ah summer!  I had a great season.  I shared a lot of laughs, adventures and good times with family and friends old and new.  I haven’t been blogging but boy have I been living!  The only problem with not writing is getting started again.  Then yesterday morning I heard the old Creedence Clearwater Revival tune “Up Around The Bend” from Cosmos Factory and knew I had my prompt.

Up Around The Bend

By Creedence Clearwater Revival

There’s a place up ahead and I’m goin’
Just as fast as my feet can fly
Come away, come away if you’re goin’,
Leave the sinkin’ ship behind.

Come on the risin’ wind,
We’re goin’ up around the bend.


Bring a song and a smile for the banjo,
Better get while the gettin’s good,
Hitch a ride to the end of the highway
Where the neons turn to wood.



You can ponder perpetual motion,
Fix your mind on a crystal day,
Always time for a good conversation,
There’s an ear for what you say.




Catch a ride to the end of the highway
And we’ll meet by the big red tree,
There’s a place up ahead and I’m goin’
Come along, come along with me.



I guess I’m wired that way.  As a soldier, I learned that On Leave means leave it behind.  As a student and later a teacher, I treasured my summer vacations.  My life certainly is NOT a “…sinkin’ ship” I need to leave behind.  But when I get to “…where the neons turn to wood,” I’m glad to get out of the glare.

Of course I found time for some Gigspotting!  Have you seen my latest videos of Medusa’s Disco, Ton-Taun, Leo & Cygnus and Stolen Rhodes?  How about my playlists from LAUNCH or The Ladybug Festival?  If not, they’ll be there and they’ll soon be joined by many more.  I’ve been up around the bend but now I’m back.

jocelynf2And whoa, Daddy, do I have some great shows lined up for fall!  I hope to see you every second Saturday at Lancaster Dispensing Company and every third Friday at The Elks Lodge Ballroom!  Up first: Jocelyn Faro and The Ragazzi plus Justin Angelo at DipCo 9/12!